Claim(p) by Maya Goldblum

I have been cordially invited by 2Modern to do a weekly guest blog which I’m extremely excited about. As I was reviewing the posts in this blog trying to find what my niche might be, I was blown away by the the depth and diversity of the blog. I find Design Crack similar in nature to this blog. That is, I let the topics be as diverse as whatever strikes me that day. For 2Modern, I’ve decided to focus purely on a very small subset: designs from recently graduated designers from English and Dutch design schools. The work that’s happening in places like the Design Academy Eindhoven or Central St. Martins is phenomenal. The teachers in these colleges tend to teach students to solve simple problems with humor and wit. They create objects that people never realized they needed until it was created rather than re-skinning an old idea, as you will soon see.

claimp by Maya Goldberg

So, on to the first post!: The Claim(p) by Maya Goldblum. Maya is a recent graduate of the Central Saint Martin’s College of Art and Design. The device is essentially a cup holder with an adjustable clamp integrated into the cup holder. The concept for the Claim(p) is to combine “claim” and “clamp” mashing the two concepts up into one idea: Claim(p). Thus, the name. What Ms. Goldblum is alluding to is that this clamp with a cup holder can claim public space for whatever function you needed by simply wrapping the device around a light pole and claiming that public space as your impromptu coffee spot for the time being. For instance, one could set up a few of these claim(p)s at a sidewalk light pole and have an instant bar for socializing.

claimp by Maya Goldberg

In the future, I cold see Ms. Goldblum expanding her idea further to include a small table for writing or eating that could claim a piece of public space for the people that like to further their public street experience. I’m drawn to the idea of the claim(p) because it seems so efficient in its ability to make something out of nearly nothing. Imagine if dozens of these devices are set up on sign posts outside of a popular cafe. It would extend the social space and business area of the cafe by quite a lot while being an advertisement for the business. However, I don’t see this concept working too well in suburbia where you might just get cars passing you where the driver is thinking, ” Why is that guy standing next to a pole drinking coffee?”

claimp by Maya Goldberg

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